Selling hot pussy

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The narration is in French but consists mostly of Butler speaking in English, providing insight on issues related to gender, sexuality and our conceptions of masculinity and femininity. She begins by explaining a scenario in which some white colleagues and her are confronted by a racist situation. Her colleagues decide to not address it selling hot pussy it is easier to ignore than to defend. She goes on to explain racism towards the female body in the s. This video may be an extreme case of over-sexualizing black women, however when speaking of this issue it must be addressed.

It is now about selling an image. Words such as classy, sophisticated and intelligent are less commonly used when describing women as they were before. Because of the media and the popularized image of women as sexual beings, women identity has lost its class and sophistication to be replaced by big butts and big tits. Curves define a real woman?

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Buttocks are perceived as sex objects whether they are black, brown, yellow, white or purple. Perhaps, it may so happen that black women are curvier than some women of Asian or American heritage are, therefore generating more interest. The way she illustrates the general white perception of black women seems to apply only to the image that one may have of the unprivileged black community — or, at least, the one represented in the media.

Then again, depictions of any unprivileged class often tend to be characterised as wild and sexualised — the concepts of white trash, hillbillies and rednecks appear as some evidence to that. While reading this article I did not find myself learning a lot of being surprised, but I did find myself entering into a world I am not usually a part of, but probably should be aware of.

But I do believe that to a certain extent, this is normal because I have never been exposed to the same history and ancestors as Hooks. In addition, I am not a very big hip hop or music video selling hot pussy, although I am aware of the image of black women in music videos she addresses during her article. This hinders my participation in the discussion enormously because not only am I from and different ethnicity, history and background I am also from a completely different genre and taste of music so I am in no way entitled to express my opinion on her explanations for I unfortunately do not have a background or complete understanding of the different representations, or lack thereof.

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What I can elaborate on though is when she talks about black models having a hard time entering and staying employed in modeling agencies. This was a documentary that I was watching for the first time and it really opened my eyes as to what actually happens behind closed doors. The blunt truth of racism and prejudice was unbelievable and not really all that avoided. Time after time the young girl searched for employment and time after time modelling agencies told her that her looks were not up to pare.

By this they meant that all the physical features found on one of their white models, especially in the face region, had to be identical or at least comparable to what was found on the black model. This was unbelievable to me because why would one want a black model with none of the black model attributes?

I can find a million racist answers to this, but none of them are understandable or legitimate for me. Hooks addresses the notion of beauty in regards to black females as depicted in the media which caught my attention. Hooks points out that the way black females are shown in the media is not representative of the typical black female.

I find it rather interesting to see that women of a certain colour have to alter their appearance—whether it be attempting to have lighter skin or straighter hair, in order to fit so-called standards of beauty. The physical image of women in the media continues to be distorted. Women are marginalized, exploited, used as the biggest selling point for products, and depicted as mere objects of sexual desire. She provides examples of how some have attempted to show an empowered black woman, but how said attempts have been undercut by elements within the production i.

She asserts that black women need to examine the representation of black women in the media in order to create a new, liberated identity. I think that this chapter is a bit dated and does not fully reflect the reality of black women today. Where Alexandra has it right is in regards to those affected: all women. As hip hop became a more mainstream lifestyle, so too did the over sexualized image of women become acceptable.

The reality I alluded to earlier is that a lot of women, not just black women, have accepted how they are portrayed in the media: the drunken, selling hot pussy party girl; the exotic, sensuous middle-eastern girl; the fiery, passionate Latina; or the wild, erotic black girl. Especially in regards to their exaggerated body parts and curviness. Black women in general, past present, always selling hot pussy to have a reputation and image of being highly sexualized. A black female icon who represents this very well is Tina Turner. Growing up, I used to watch Tina Turner on T.

After reading this article, and learning about her past, it makes sense why she took on this image. Tina Turner took control of what happened to her by using her sexuality to overcome powerlessness. I believe that any woman that has gone through some form of abuse has two choices. One, remain being a victim. Or two, become a survivor. In terms of being a survivor, it would entail taking what happened and using it as a form of self empowerment. And this can take on many forms. Also selling hot pussy within this chapter is the story of the celebrity icon Tina Turner and her personal struggle as a woman facing abuse and having to rationalize her experience.

This experience was not one of personal connection and romance, but rather one of pain, pressure and struggle to please. Turner felt that it was her obligation to have sexual intercourse with her boyfriend at the time and to this day, rationalizes that it was the right thing to do even after the uncertainty that she was experiencing. Now more than ever, sexual images from the media center on the perfect female body and place pressure on women to achieve these unrealistic goals. Though many believe that we have achieved gender selling hot pussy and expectations are equal within both sexes, there is still an insurmountable amount of pressure on women to act, look and feel a certain way.

How can we shift this outlook? Will expectation always surround us? In reaction to a situation she encountered with her friends, she explores manifestations of the popularized sexual view of black bodies through examining the lives and portrayals of the likes of Tina Turner, as well as models Iman and Naomi Campbell. The chapter discusses themes which I had a hard time grasping in the beginning since the forced sexualization of black women is not something I encounter on a daily basis, being from a different cultural background and not being into hip hop or pop culture where striking images might appear more regularly.

When I was finally able to wrap my mind around the idea, however, I found it incredible how Hook traced the images back in time and exposed what they are today as a direct result of an ever-evolving sequence of black-female portrayals dating back to American slavery.

That said, I admire Hook for writing the chapter and exposing this history. Perhaps if more people like myself were aware of this history, we would be less inclined to encourage and accept token images for magazines that suggest inadequate beauty, necessary sexuality, and less-than-important humanity in the human beings in the picture. I agree with Butler in that to be born with female genitalia does not automatically make you neither a feminist or feminine or a female at all. Sex changes and people who feel they were born into the wrong body is a topic much more discussed now that it ever has been.

Also, there are many males e. She gives a great example with the story of Tina Turner. She explains that although in the public eye she was viewed as a wild sexual woman, she was being abused by her husband at the time. By giving these examples, Hooks drives her point that women and in this case, specifically black women and their progress for equality are still viewed quite differently by males.

Do males still control forms of media leaving women to be manipulated by men? Hook focuses on music videos and performances by making her claims that the black female body is more sexualized then the white female body and that these bodies are used in the music industry for success in selling music and making fans.

In my opinion, a buttock of any race can be depicted as a sex symbol. Personally, I agree that black female bodies are overused in the media to sell things although I do think that the white sexualized female body is equally used in the media, which goes beyond music and videos. It is also in all media forms such as advertisements. While she mainly focused on black women, I think many of her points can be made about women in general. At the same time though, women are more than just their parts.

I believe that black women are particularly subjugated to this sexualization I mean, the one example I used was of a black womenis because being black citizens are still not the same rank as caucasian citizens. And I believe that why women are more sexualized than men are is because women are not considered selling hot pussy be the same rank as men.

Until women have the equal rights to men, and blacks equal rights to whites, women, especially black women, are going to be sexualized and dumbed-down by society. Bell Hooks stresses the fact that racism is expressed in everyday encounters and explains more about how it is seen in popular culture.

He says that the sexuality of the black has become an icon for deviant sexuality. He talks about how black female slaves were displayed for whites at auctions and social functions and that they were reduced to mere objects or commodities.

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In their mind, these black females they see themselves as a wild, tough, sexually liberated woman, but the message they are portraying is rather the opposite; they are only reinforcing white patriarchally selling hot pussy and selling hot pussy of the black female as a wild sexual savage. Their sexuality is therefore used as a burden rather than anything else, because they represent ideologies of the past. Moreover, the article also talks about the presence of black women in magazines. Sometimes, they are just thrown into magazines to show that the magazine is racially inclusive.

The magazines tend to mock the very notion of beauty, making black women look animalistic and scary and sexually deviant instead of the traditional beautiful. They would often choose black females who had white traits straight nose, fair-skinned black women, etc. I found this part of the article interesting because we see today still that workplaces are taking the same approach in order to make their institutions seem racially inclusive.

Our bodies have a passive role. Anyone that fails to conform with the norms of identity are usually ostracized i. Sexuality is constructed within the terms of discourse and power and is a form of masculine oppression.

Although feminist may be fighting for women rights, if women were to achieve those rights, some would still be disadvantaged and others would be more privileged. For example, black sexuality is seen as deviant, whereas white sexuality is not. As I read the statement, I felt that it wants women to become as sexually liberated as some men and carefree. This is especially obvious in contemporary popular music videos today, especially Hip Hop and Rap videos. I did not know her entire story and so it was very interesting to read about it and the way in which Hooks analyses it.

Turner faced abuse throughout her life and, in her autobiography, goes on rationalizing such experiences. In order to overcome these views of black female bodies as sexual and submissive, she used her body as a source of power.

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Hooks also gives examples of portrayals in movies, which equally show this negative sexualization. Nicki Minaj and it never fails to shock me that the women themselves would be willing to take part in such videos. I think that both men and women in the media should change these views. Hooks makes reference to racism and slavery when describing how black female sexuality is represented and exploited in the popular culture.

I find it interesting how the author contrasts the white female body with black female body. She states how the white people allowed themselves to dissociate sexually with the black presence. Thus, she argues that the black female body has become an icon for deviant sexuality and it is selling hot pussy to serve this image in general. In addition, the black female body has been represented as a commodity available to other men.

The author states several times in the article that songs and films often associate black female bodies with accessibility and availability in terms of sexual deviance. Hooks discusses how a of black singers have created an image of themselves that corresponds to this idea where they are sexually deviant. I believe that it is very sad that black female are portrayed and represented in these ways.

It is unfortunate that black women would have to confront the challenge where old representations of their sexuality will still be representations that are present nowadays. However, this has not started recently.

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It begun during slavery. Turners describes this instance and event as something she was ready for and basically in control of. Although I cannot prove who is right and who is wrong I believe that any women has the choice to do what she wants and believes in. This sexual experience is nothing uncommon.

Selling hot pussy

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Our understanding and reflection on 'Chapter 4 Selling hot pussy representations of black female sexuality in the cultural marketplace' in 'Black Looks: